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Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein, Modern Orthodox Scholar, Dies at 81

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 08:34
Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein, a leader of the Israeli national-religious movement and a prominent Modern Orthodox scholar, has died.

Women Read From Torah Scroll at Western Wall

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 06:44
Women of the Wall read from a full-size Torah scroll during the group’s monthly prayer service at the Western Wall.

Elio Toaff, Rabbi Who Brought First Pope to Synagogue, Dies at 99

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 06:27
Elio Toaff, the chief rabbi of Rome for half a century and a pivotal player in Christian-Jewish reconciliation, has died at the age of 99.

Poland Demands Apology from FBI Chief Over Holocaust Remarks

Sun, 04/19/2015 - 12:03
Poland’s Foreign Ministry protested remarks by FBI director James Comey in which he said the Poles were the Nazis’ accomplices during the Holocaust.

FBI Chief James Comey Says Holocaust Key Lesson for Agents

Fri, 04/17/2015 - 07:47

FBI director James Comey called the Holocaust the most significant event in history and said that’s why a U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum program on its lessons is mandatory for new agents.

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Chilly Scenes of Cleveland Synagogues

Fri, 04/17/2015 - 06:00

What happens when a senior rabbi announces from the pulpit on Rosh Hashanah that he is suffering from ALS? In his posthumously published novel, Raphael Silver chronicles the power struggle.

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'Felix and Meira' Reaches Into a Cloistered World — and Beyond

Thu, 04/16/2015 - 06:00

In ‘Felix and Meira,’ director Maxime Giroux opens a window on the nuances of Hasidic life. And he creates a beautiful and bittersweet story at the same time.

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Suburban Washington D.C. Teen Admits Synagogue Vandalism

Wed, 04/15/2015 - 13:46

A suburban Washington teenager reportedly has confessed to police that he vandalized a local synagogue.

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Heard the One About the Jewish Musical That's Better Than You'd Think?

Wed, 04/15/2015 - 06:00

‘It Shoulda Been You,’ a new Jewish-bride-marries-gentile musical, sounds like a stream of cliches. But Jesse Oxfeld says it turns out to be a lot smarter than that.

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Manhattan Synagogue Members Sue To Block $13M Building Sale

Tue, 04/14/2015 - 20:36

Members of a Manhattan synagogue are asking a judge to halt the sale of their building in a deal made without their knowledge.

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At the Consultation: Supporting a Secure, Peaceful Israel

Tue, 04/14/2015 - 17:00

The past few months have been eventful for Israelis and those who care about Israel, in more ways than one. At Consultation on Conscience (April 26-28), there will be an opportunity to discuss current issues in Israel on Monday evening at 7:15 PM. The event will feature Rabbi Rick Jacobs, President of the Union for Reform Judaism, Natan Sachs, a fellow at the Brookings Institution and Rabbi Noa Sattath, Director of the Israel Religious Action Center (IRAC). Tune in for the livestream at youtube.com/racrj.

Within Israel, a focus for millions of Israelis was the new elections for Knesset (Israel’s parliament), which occurred in March. The country held elections after the previous governing coalition, which had been in office for less than two years, dissolved and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called for new elections. After a close election campaign that pitted Prime Minister Netanyahu’s right-wing Likud party, against the center-left Zionist Camp, Prime Minister Netanyahu won a convincing victory and is in talks with other parties to form a coalition.

Outside of Israel, there’s an important election that’s still going on: the World Zionist Congress elections. ARZA, the Zionist wing of the Reform Movement, has put together a slate of Reform Movement leaders that are gearing up to fight for civil rights, religious pluralism and peace. Having ARZA do well in the World Zionist Congress elections gives ARZA influence and funding power over the Jewish Agency, the World Zionist Organization, the Jewish National Fund and other vitally important agencies and organizations in Israel and around the world. Voting is open until April 30th, so go vote!

Israel and the United States have also been working to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. After a year and a half of negotiations, the P5+1 (the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Russia and China, plus Germany) and Iran agreed to a framework deal to limit Iran’s nuclear program. Reform Movement leaders have expressed reservations about conditions in the agreement, while still supporting diplomacy as the best alternative to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon.

Amidst these global-scale events, we’ve also been monitoring a continued string of tensions in Jerusalem and attacks targeting women and non-Jews. Of note, there has been a continuing legal battle over flights by Israeli airline El Al, which have sometimes been delayed due to ultra-Orthodox men demanding that the women who are sitting next to them move seats.

Join us at the Consultation or by livestream to learn more about Israeli affairs.

Rabbi Yoshiyahu Pinto Pleads Guilty To Bribing Israeli Police

Tue, 04/14/2015 - 10:49

Celebrity Israeli Rabbi Yoshiyahu Pinto pleaded guilty in a Tel Aviv court to charges of bribery as part of a plea deal.

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Shots Fired at Nashville Synagogue

Mon, 04/13/2015 - 14:32

No one was injured when shots were fired outside a Nashville synagogue.

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A Light that Will Never Go Out: Am Yisrael Chai

Mon, 04/13/2015 - 12:00

This week, we mark Yom HaShoah (April 15-16) — Holocaust Remembrance Day — a day when Jewish communities gather together to commemorate the day through worship, music and stories from survivors and lighting yellow candles as symbol of the living memories of the victims. Yom HaShoah is a time to remember and reflect. It is also a time to also recommitment ourselves to fighting bigotry and anti-Semitism. And, for me, Yom HaShoah is a time to think about the notion of Jewish peoplehood.

Roughly six years ago, when I was in high school, I was fortunate enough to travel to Poland with my synagogue. We had a sort of exchange program going: each year, Jewish students from Eastern Europe would come to Tampa and spend the week touring the city and interacting with our Jewish community and then, months later, a group of students from our temple youth group would travel to Poland and the once-exchange students would share their city and their community with us.

The trip was everything you might expect it to be — heartbreaking, moving, thoughtful, meaningful, inspiring, and even, at times, fun. I remember how surprised I was when we first arrived at Auschwitz. Every picture or video I had ever seen from the Holocaust was in black and white, and as I stood at the camps and saw the green grass and red brick buildings, I was taken aback. While intellectually I knew that life does not happen in black and white, I think I assumed the Holocaust had happened in black and white as a way to distance myself from this heinous, terrifying time in history. Seeing the camps in full color forced me to see the humanity (or lack thereof) and reality of this tragedy. It reminded me that the six million Jews and five million non-Jews killed during the Holocaust are not just one number, but 11 million individual human beings who each had a life and a family and each of their individual lives taken from them.

I remember walking through the camps with our Jewish, Eastern European friends thinking, “They [the Nazis] didn’t win.” Even though so many millions of people were killed, the fact that young Jewish teenagers from across the world were walking through concentration camps together as free people meant that the Nazis had lost. They did not extinguish the Jewish people, as the flames of the yahrzeit candles we light remind us.

This year, my reflections on Yom HaShoah have new meaning – I am working for and in the Jewish community to make the world more just. In this work, and in thinking about and mourning the Holocaust, the profound realization I had when walking through Auschwitz stays with me: Am Yisrael Chai, the people of Israel live.

Israel and Iran Experts Cooperate on Nuclear Test Panel

Mon, 04/13/2015 - 11:37

Iran and Israel have been cooperating under the auspices of an international body set up to monitor a ban on nuclear bomb tests, its director said on Monday.

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The Anne Frank Center USA and The Consulate General of the...

Mon, 04/13/2015 - 09:19

Join us Tuesday, March 24, 2015 from 6:30-8:30 pm at The Koubek Center at Miami Dade College for a panel discussion on immigration reform with Felipe Sousa-Rodriguez, Deputy-Managing Director of...

(PRWeb March 13, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12578376.htm

Ten Students Begin Studies in Online Rabbinical School: Tenth class...

Mon, 04/13/2015 - 09:19

The Jewish Spiritual Leaders’ Institute (JSLI) Online Rabbinical School has matriculated its 10th class of rabbinical students. These students will receive their semicha, or certificate of ordination,...

(PRWeb March 11, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12564895.htm

A Vote for ARZA is a Vote for Progressive Zionism: Why We’re on the ARZA Slate

Mon, 04/13/2015 - 09:00

By Shira and friend of the RAC, Ronit Zemel, incoming Assistant Director of Harlam Day Camp

In the front hallway of our home growing up was a picture of our great grandfather, Rabbi Solomon Goldman, standing next to Chaim Weizmann at one of the gatherings of the World Zionist Congress in the late 1930s. This picture is a hallmark of our upbringing as liberal Zionist Jews. We heard lore of our grandmother’s grade school education at the Riali school in Haifa. Our dad told us stories of his first time in Israel as a thirteen year old, peering out into the still forbidden Old City from a lookout tower in Jerusalem. Then we had the opportunity to see Israel for ourselves; to see the vibrant Jewish life in cafes and the shuk, on buses and in kibbutz fields. Israel is a part of the fabric of our family.

Our father tells stories about singing songs of the yeshuv in his Jewish day school when he was growing up. As children, each summer at Camp Harlam we would sing the same songs and look forward to befriending our Israeli counselors. Through family trips to Israel, NFTY EIE, a gap year for Ronit spent in Tel Aviv, and conversations around our family dinner table, we have learned to push, scrutinize and consider our complex relationship with Israel.

Is it enough to feel that Israel is a homeland, or must we actively support Israel as a modern Jewish State? And as Americans, where does our fundamental belief in democracy factor in to our attitudes? As Reform Zionists, we consider these questions and more, so that we can love Israel as sincerely as possible: when we were young we sang songs and ate chocolate and learned to love the land, and as we grew older we were taught to look honestly at the land we had grown to love.

During this WZO election season, we are reminded of Herzl’s famous words: Im Tirzu Ein Zo Aggadah– if you will it, it is no dream. It was the will of our founding Zionist forefathers to build a state of our own upon Jewish and democratic values.  We have fallen in love with their dream– the modern, thriving Jewish state of Israel.  But the dream is far from complete. We play a part as Israel’s story continues to unfold. This is why we are on the ARZA slate and encourage everyone to vote for ARZA in the World Zionist Congress elections: A vote for ARZA is a vote for our shared dream of a pluralistic, egalitarian and democratic Israel– it’s a vote for a progressive Zionism of which we can be proud.

Vote now! www.reformjews4israel.org/

 

'The King' and Us

Mon, 04/13/2015 - 06:00

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein are the Jewish kings of the American musical. How could they have been so shockingly insensitive — even racist — in their epic ‘The King and I’?

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Deaf Church

Fri, 04/10/2015 - 15:54

To save money, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York wants to close several dozen of its churches, including the Church of St. Elizabeth of Hungary in New York City known for its 35-year-old ministry to the deaf. But the deaf parishioners are determined to oppose the plan, even appealing to the Pope and arguing that no other church can provide for their needs like St. Elizabeth.

The post Deaf Church appeared first on Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly.